DAK says that infants who use phones too young may have delayed language and cognitive abilities
DAK says that infants who use phones too young may have delayed language and cognitive abilities
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Minutes after its debut, Kari Paul put the social network to the test – Is Elon Musk right to be scared, or did it fail to impress you?

Threads, a new text-based software from Meta, has been released to compete with Twitter.

This is a risky effort to steal customers from a failing rival by creating an almost identical product. The Guardian tried out the much-anticipated social network on Wednesday. Do you think it would fall flat, or that it may cause Elon Musk serious trouble?

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Getting started

The launch showed off a simple, straightforward interface that works well with other systems.Instagram

We gave Threads—Meta’s latest Twitter competitor—a go. So, this is what went down:
Is Elon Musk right to be worried that Kari Paul tried out the new social network within minutes of its debut and found it lacking?

Threads, a new text-based software from Meta, has been released to compete with Twitter.
This is a risky effort to steal customers from a failing rival by creating an almost identical product. The Guardian tried out the much-anticipated social network on Wednesday. Do you think it would fall flat or that it may cause Elon Musk serious trouble?

Getting started

A simple, straightforward interface that works well with Instagram was shown at launch.
To begin, I looked for “Threads” in the app store, scrolled over a few useless applications that were also titled Threads (RIP, regrettably), and then settled on Threads by Meta. When prompted to join in with Instagram, I used my business account rather than my personal one (no, I won’t be sharing my Facebook with you). And just like that, I signed up for Threads.
Signing up for Threads requires an existing Instagram username, so if you don’t have one yet, you’ll need to get one before you can use the service. My first thought was whether or not I should duplicate my personal Instagram account on Threads, but that’s a discussion for another day. My current Twitter handle is @karipaul__.

How it works

Threads provides a microblogging experience strikingly similar to that of Twitter.

It was as if Twitter and Instagram had a more practical offspring, and that offspring was Threads.

When you open the app, you’ll see a “thread” with a variety of actions you may do on it, such as “like,” “repost,” “reply,” and “quote,” as well as “like” and “reply” counts. Unlike Twitter, which only allows 280 characters per tweet, Instagram posts may be up to 500 characters long and contain media such as images and videos (with a maximum length of five minutes).
Threads made me feel like I was in a fever dream where Twitter and Instagram had more practical offspring. The feed was clean and simple to read, but it was currently filled with accounts I did not follow or care about. This may change as more people join the service.
Threads lacks a search function and doesn’t seem to make use of hashtags, making it less useful than Twitter for finding particular information. In addition, unlike Twitter’s four-image restriction, users may upload up to 10 photographs in a single post on this service.
The software was tested in the United States, but it is now available in more than 100 countries across the world, including the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and Japan, via the Apple and Google Android app stores.
Some have wondered whether Instagram and a site like Twitter might result in a collision of cultures. How will our carefully staged picture life interact with the spontaneous, meme-filled, and sometimes erratic Twitter feed? This is all really unusual, new, and interesting.

So, is it better than Twitter?

Using Meta’s Twitter clone is very similar to using the original. Like its forerunner, this microblogging platform retains the ability to “like,” “retweet,” and “follow” other users. However, when Musk took control, Twitter became more cumbersome and difficult to use, so the relief of finally being able to launch an app and see and interact with material without any hiccups was all the more welcome.
That’s the kind of user experience Meta is banking on, declaring boldly that Twitter’s anarchy has cleared the way for its own platform. Instagram’s president of product, Adam Mosseri, recently spoke with The Verge, where he said that the firm saw a need for a new platform due to the “unpredictability” of Twitter.
Mosseri said that “Twitter obviously pioneered the space.” “But given what was happening, we thought there was an opportunity to build something that was open and good for the community that was already using Instagram.”
Even though I’m a tech journalist who has written extensively on privacy issues with Meta, the company’s blatant copying of rivals’ apps, and the expanding unrestrained power of tech, I found Threads to be a pleasant experience. Already, I often use WhatsApp and Instagram, and my Facebook profile is all but idle. Should I trust one of the world’s top tech corporations with even more of my personal information?

Should we be worried about Meta’s growing power?

Threads, like many other Meta-run programmes, delivers the disconcerting sense of blending in almost too perfectly with preexisting software. When you sign up for Instagram, you’ll be able to follow people already in your social network. If you create an account and start posting, your followers will probably be alerted, so they may follow suit.
There are also persistent problems with privacy. Many critics have voiced their disapproval of the internet giant’s latest attempt to draw customers further into the company’s ecosystem by launching Threads. According to its data privacy declaration on the App Store, Threads is able to gather a broad variety of personal information, including but not limited to health, financial, contacts, browsing and search history, location data, transactions, and “sensitive info.”
Due to these concerns, Threads is now unavailable in the European Union, which has stringent regulations regarding the protection of user data. The business is working on expanding the app’s availability to new nations, although a rollout in Europe has been delayed due to regulatory concerns.
To ensure the security of its users, Meta has prioritised features like the ability to restrict who may mention or react to a user and the enforcement of Instagram’s community rules.
This article includes AP research.

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